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BedRobbers

 

IMG_4264Fishing for bass during the spawn or “bed fishing” as it been called has been a center of controversy around here for some time.  The whole method of yanking a bass off a bed right under the boat doesn’t seem to take a lot of skill (its not as simple as it looks) but it has its attraction for some.  I personally don’t think it’s an exceptionally fun way to fish, but I get it.  Seeing an 8 pounder in five feet of water that you know will bite almost anything in front of it is hard to pass on.  …and in my experience, I don’t necessarily think the fish guarding the beds are the easiest to catch either.  After they’ve been hooked half a dozen times in a day they pretty much just lock up and move away from any bait that gets close.  But, however,  it is my favorite time of year to fish.  Not so much because the fish are on the beds, but because there are fish everywhere.  Some are on the spawn, some are post spawn and some are pre-spawn.  You can literally catch bass in 2 feet of water or 20 feet of water, without even moving the boat, in some cases That’s where the BedRobber comes in.  To be clear the BedRobber is not a “bed” fly.  A true bed fly would be heavily weighted, have the hook point up and be in only one color, all white.  The BedRobber is named so because it imitates the size of bluegill or sunfish that is constantly around while the bass are in spawn mode.  Most of the bass, male or female, but especially the males, are keyed in on the sunfish crowd even well after they move off the beds.  The best fish to target are not the ones sitting on beds, but the fish cruising just off the beds.  These fish constantly cruise back and forth and are either tying to spawn or just finished spawning and seem to be much more consistently aggressive than fish on the beds.   Because these fish are cruising through the beds, they are a prime target for flies not fished directly on the bottom.  I do a lot of sight fishing during this time of year and when I spot a fish that’s shallow and moving around a lot, its game on….

Tying one up

The BedRobber is a really simple tie.  It rides hook down and uses smaller lead eyes for some weight.  The rabbit zonker strip has some hydrodynamics that keep the sink rate slower so don’t use dumbbell eyes that are too big. This gives a slow sink rate and when fished on an intermediate sink tip line, I can cast to the bank and strip into deeper water and let it settle into the depths on the retrieve when needed.  Although I advertise this as a springtime fly, the BedRobber, does well all year around.  The lakes around my stretch of the woods, (and by woods I mean cactus), have tons of weedbeds, both shallow and deep, and bass will bury themselves deep inside when the temperatures gets high in the summer.  Fished over and around these weedbeds and in the backs of coves during the summer and into the fall, the BedRobber is one of the standard go to flies in the boat.   You can spin up a variety of different color combinations and your imagination is the limit, but the best two producers for me so far is an olive/green sunfish color and an all brown smallmouth pattern.

DSC_0022UNWEIGHTED VERSION

Hook: Umpqua U502 size 2
Body:  Spirit Rivers Palmer Chenille, Olive
Underwing:  Marabou, palmered, tan or cream
Overwing:  Olive zonker strip
Eyes:  Spirit Rivers 3D molded eyes

 

 

DSC_0014WEIGHTED VERSION

Hook: Umpqua U502 size 2
Eyes:  Allen Flyfishing brass barbells w/insert
Body:  Spirit Rivers Palmer Chenille, Olive
Underwing:  Marabou, palmered, tan or cream
Overwing:  Olive zonker strip
Eyes:  Allen Flyfishing brass barbells w/insert
Head:  LazerDub, Sculpin Olive

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